Basic Principles of Dharma, Justice and Democracy

Basic Principles of Dharma, Justice and Democracy

(Quoted from Book entitled – “Basic Principles of Dharma, Justice and Democracy”)

Our vision for all round sustainable development of individuals and society presupposes promotion of “Dharma, Justice, Democracy, Peace and Social Harmony” (in their true sense and spirit) in the entire world, as it is “sine qua non” (an indispensable condition) for amicable and sustainable solution of public problems, for all round sustainable development of individuals and society, and for “Social and National Reconstruction for a Better India and Better World”.
Our philosophy of “Dharma and Culture”, “Law and Justice”, and “Democracy” is as follows:
1. CONCEPT OF DHARMA AND CULTURE
As explained in “Atharva Veda” and as interpreted by Lord Krishna in “Mahabharat”, it can be rightly said that –“Satya, Reet, Ugra, Diksha, Tapa, Brahma and Yagnya” – these are the “Seven Pillars of Dharma”, on the basis of which the civilized society of the entire world is maintained, upheld and sustained in order and all round sustainable development and prosperity of individuals, society, state, nation and world community is made possible on this Earth.
In Atharwaveda, the concept of Dharma has been defined as follows:
सत्यं बृहद ॠतं उग्रं दीक्षा तपो ब्रह्म यज्ञः पृथिविं धारयन्ति ।
— अथर्ववेद, १२.१.१

“Satyam brihad ritam ugram diksha tapo brahma yagnyah prithivim dharayanti.”
–Atharwaveda, 12.1.1
In Mahabharat, Lord Krishna has explained the concept of Dharma as follows:

धारणाद्धर्ममित्याहुर्धर्मो धारयते प्रजाः ।
यत्स्यादधारण संयुक्तं स धर्म इति निश्चयः ॥
— महाभारत, कर्णपर्व, ६९.५८

“Dharanad dharmamityahurdharmo dharayate prajah.
Yatsyad dharan samyuktam sa dharma iti nischayah.”
–Mahabharat, Karnaparva, 69.58
Hence it can be rightly said that –“Satya, Reet, Ugra, Diksha, Tapa, Brahma and Yagnya” – these are the “Seven Pillars of Dharma”, on the basis of which the civilized society of the entire world is maintained, upheld and sustained in order and all round sustainable development and prosperity of individuals, society, state, nation and world community is made possible on this Earth.
In other words, “Dharma” is the name of the “Noble Path of Righteousness” and that kind of noble qualities, human virtues, human duties, ideal judicious conduct of human beings and right kind of human behavior, which are helpful in establishment and promotion of peace, prosperity, social harmony and rule of justice in society; which are helpful in prevention, suppression and control of all kinds of crime, extremism and terrorism; which are helpful in protection of life, property, dignity and honor of all individuals; which are helpful in finding out amicable and sustainable solution of all kinds of individual, social, national and international problems; which are helpful in full and free enjoyment of fundamental human rights as well as in full and free enjoyment of life by the people in a disciplined way without violating the rights of others.
The Concept of “Dharma” contemplates abandonment and relinquishment of the “Ten Kinds of Manava Durguna” (Human Vices), namely- 1. Irshya (Grudge), 2. Dwesha (Malice), 3. Krodha (Anger), 4. Lobha (Greed), 5. Moha (Delusion of Mind), 6. Purvagrah (Prejudice), 7. Pakshapat (Bias), 8. Bhaya (Fear), 9.Ghrina (Hatred) and 10. Ahankar (Empty Pride).
The Concept of “Dharma” further contemplates development and possession of at least “Twelve Kinds of Manava Sadguna” (Human Virtues), namely- 1. Dhairya (Patience), 2. Dhriti (Firmness of Body and Mind), 3. Dama (Self- Restraint and Self- Discipline), 4. Daya (Kindness), 5. Kshama (Forgiveness), 6.Prema (Love), 7. Paropkar (Benevolence), 8. Vinamrata (Courtesy), 9. Nirbhikata (Fearlessness), 10. Sahas (Boldness), 11. Adhyavasaya (Perseverance), and 12. Vishva Bandhutva (Friendly Treatment with People of the Entire World).
The Concept of “Dharma” provides “Foundation” for development of all “Cultures” and “Religions” of the entire world, providing different kinds of Places & Methods of God Worship, Rites & Rituals, Symbols, Festivals, Codes of Conduct, Dress Codes etc., which are adaptable and changeable by taking into account “Desha” (Locality), “Kaal” (Time) and “Paatra” (Person). But “Dharma” is always equally applicable to all persons, at all places and at all times.
2. CONCEPT OF LAW AND JUSTICE
The Concept of “Dharma” contains the “Sanction of Law” and its “Rules” are always equally applicable to all alike, whether he / she may be a King / Queen or an ordinary citizen. “Law” is an instrument for establishment, maintenance, enforcement and promotion of “Dharma” in society, for maintenance, upholding and sustenance of order in society, for enforcement of rights, upholding of justice and redressal of wrongs as well as for bringing about all round sustainable development and prosperity of individuals, society, state, nation and world community.
The Concept of “Nyaya” or “Justice” contemplates “Victory of Dharma in all its features”, by giving each and every person what is due to him or her in accordance with the “Rules of Dharma”, for forcible defense of rights and suppression of wrongs, that is called “Real Justice”, which further contemplates immediate suitable punishment to the guilty or offender, suitable compensation to the victim and suitable award or reward to the person working for the “Victory of Dharma in all its features”.
The “Rule of Justice” fixes and determines the exercise of personal rights of individual liberty in the pursuit of individual welfare, happiness, development and prosperity, so as to confine that individual liberty within the limits which are consistent with the general welfare of mankind for all round sustainable development and prosperity of the society, state, nation and world community.
The Concept of “Nyaya” or “Justice” contemplates that, for proper administration of “Justice”, at the time of hearing and at the time of delivery of “Judgment” in each and every case, a “Judge or Judicial Officer” sitting at the “Throne of Justice” must always keep himself / herself free from the “Ten Kinds of Manava Durguna” (Human Vices), namely- 1. Irshya (Grudge), 2. Dwesha (Malice), 3. Krodha (Anger), 4. Lobha (Greed), 5. Moha (Delusion of Mind), 6. Purvagrah (Prejudice), 7. Pakshapat (Bias), 8. Bhaya (Fear), 9.Ghrina (Hatred) and 10. Ahankar (Empty Pride).
3. CONCEPT OF DEMOCRACY
“Democracy” is an English substitute word for its Sanskrit equivalent term “Janatantra”.
“Democracy” is a system of governance under which the greatest, noblest, finest, fittest and the most competent persons are elected or selected by the people to rule over the society (State), for proper administration, control and management of the entire affairs of the society (State), for finding out amicable and sustainable solution of public problems, for establishment, enforcement and promotion of Dharma (Righteousness), for suppression and prevention of Adharma (Unrighteousness), for development of infrastructure facilities for common use by the people of all communities, for all round sustainable development and prosperity of individuals, society and state and for attainment of its certain other objectives for which the society (State) is established and its government is formed.

The concept of Dharma contemplates appointment of the greatest, noblest, finest, fittest and the most competent persons against all kinds of Judicial, Legislative, Executive and Administrative Posts of Responsibility, who must have command over professional knowledge and skill and must keep themselves free from the “Ten Kinds of Manava Durguna” (Human Vices), namely- 1. Irshya (Grudge), 2. Dwesha (Malice), 3. Krodha (Anger), 4. Lobha (Greed), 5. Moha (Delusion of Mind), 6. Purvagrah (Prejudice), 7. Pakshapat (Bias), 8. Bhaya (Fear), 9.Ghrina (Hatred), and 10. Ahankar (Empty Pride), and who must possess in themselves “Twelve Kinds of Manava Sadguna” (Human Virtues), namely- 1. Dhairya (Patience), 2. Dhriti (Firmness of body and mind, firm determination), 3. Dama (Self Discipline), 4. Daya (Kindness), 5. Kshama (Forgiveness), 6. Prema (Love for nature and all creatures), 7. Paropkar (Benevolence), 8. Vinamrata (Courtesy and decency in behavior), 9. Nirbhikata (Fearlessness), 10. Sahas (Boldness and courage), 11. Adhyawasaya (Perservance), and 12. Vishwa Bandhutwa (Universal Respect for the people of all communities, states and nations of the entire world by treating them as one’s own family members, relatives and friends).
— Krishna Ballabha Sharma “Yogiraj”
(Quoted from the book entitled “Basic Principles of Dharma, Justice and Democracy”)

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